The Beatles

Introducing Paul Mccartney The Ultimate Music

On June 18 this year, Paul McCartney will hit the auspicious age of 75. For more than two-thirds of his life, he has been one of the most famous people on the planet, and one of the most feted musicians in history. Through that time, too, he has devised and sustained many ingenious coping strategies to handle the stresses that such a level of success and recognition must inevitably bring. Few superstars have perfected an air of normality as convincingly as Macca. But what is he really like?

Uncut’s latest deluxe Ultimate Music Guide to Paul McCartney goes some way, hopefully, to figuring out that riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma (The issue goes on sale in the UK this Thursday, but you’ll be able to buy a copy from our online store).

The story begins on April 18, 1970, when an unusual dispatch from McCartney appeared in the NME. Instead of participating in a normal interview, McCartney had sent the UK media a printed statement, in which he (or, at least, a shadowy enabler at Apple) asked the questions as well as supplying the answers. A delicate situation, he believed, needed to be micromanaged with extreme care.

Nevertheless, McCartney did not spare himself the difficult subjects. There was a solo album to discuss, of course, one all about “Home. Family. Love.” But also, there was the outstanding business of where the arrival of “McCartney” left The Beatles. “Are you planning a new album or single with The Beatles?” McCartney challenged himself. “No,” he responded.

“Is your break up with The Beatles, temporary or permanent, due to personal differences or musical ones?” McCartney persisted. “Personal differences,” he came back. “Business differences. Musical differences, but most of all, because I have a better time with my family.”

“What are your plans now? A holiday? A musical? A movie? Retirement?”

“My only plan is to grow up.”

And there it was: the end of something that changed the world, and the start of the rest of Paul McCartney’s life. As McCartney reaches 75, he has now spent nearly five times as many years out of The Beatles as he did in them. It is those frequently remarkable years that we’re focusing on in this latest deluxe edition of the Uncut Ultimate Music Guide. With a selection of articles rescued from the NME, Melody Maker and Uncut archives, and with extensive new reviews of every album, we trace the highs, lows and neglected margins of McCartney’s post-Beatles career.

There are frank reflections on life past and present, bantering encounters with Wings, a constant and fascinating narrative about how McCartney tries to reconcile being “Mr Normal” with being, well, Sir Paul McCartney. There’s also an epic interview from a 2004 issue of Uncut, in which McCartney, a shrewd media operator ever since the earliest days of The Beatles, talks with unprecedented candour about every phase of his career.

“I’ve put out an awful lot of records. Some of them I shouldn’t have put out, sure,” he admits in the piece. “I’d gladly accept that. There’s many different reasons for putting a record out. Sometimes I might just put one out because I’m bored and I’ve got nothing better to do. That happens.”

Few artists have had anything remotely close to the cultural impact of Paul McCartney. Nevertheless, his discography is surprisingly full of odd excursions and experiments, of great songs hidden away and half-forgotten. This Uncut Ultimate Music Guide is also, we hope, a key to the treasures of Macca’s long, engrossing second act. Let us roll it!

Source: Uncut Home

Bonobo Release Surprise New EP

Bonobo has shared new EP ‘Bambro Koyo Ganda’ – and he’s working on a VR experience.

The production just completed a host of North American shows for his ‘Migration’ album, and is ready to take another new step.

Album cut ‘Bambro Koyo Ganda’ is presented alongside an alternate analogue version, while Bonobo also sneaks out new cut ‘Samurai’.

Out now, you can check the analogue version of ‘Bambro Koyo Ganda’ below.

Meanwhile Bonobo has also crafted a very special VR experience for album track ‘Outlier’.

Released in collaboration with Horizons Studio for their app on Google’s Daydream platform, users can soar across surreal mountainscapes.

Get involved HERE.

Buy Clash Magazine

Bonobo has shared new EP ‘Bambro Koyo Ganda’ – and he’s working on a VR experience.

The production just completed a host of North American shows for his ‘Migration’ album, and is ready to take another new step.

Album cut ‘Bambro Koyo Ganda’ is presented alongside an alternate analogue version, while Bonobo also sneaks out new cut ‘Samurai’.

Out now, you can check the analogue version of ‘Bambro Koyo Ganda’ below.

Meanwhile Bonobo has also crafted a very special VR experience for album track ‘Outlier’.

Released in collaboration with Horizons Studio for their app on Google’s Daydream platform, users can soar across surreal mountainscapes.

Get involved HERE.

Buy Clash Magazine

Source: Clash Music

In Conversation Elephant Stone

If just one North American band touches down for a UK tour this particular week, you’d want it to be Elephant Stone.

Named after a great Mancunian anthem, the Montreal-formed trio are a joyous clash of musical cultures, heavily inspired by British rock but with classical Indian influences due to their leader, the sitar-riffing Rishi Dhir.

That unique sound is captured splendidly on their new live EP, ‘Live at the Verge.’ Two of the band’s biggest influences are The Beatles, naturally, but also Teenage Fanclub, and they’ve just announced a bit of a dream gig for Dhir, on Monday: supporting the Fannies in Glasgow, before Elephant Stone rush elsewhere to play their own show. Quite an evening.

We caught up with Dhir in Belgium, the day after the first gig of their European tour in Holland, and just before they boarded the ferry to Britain.

– – –

– – –

It must be a pretty bewildering moment to be arriving in the UK… but I also think you’re the perfect band to go see this week.
Yeah, I heard the news on Monday. We were in Delph in the Netherlands, the morning after we arrived, and it was a shock.

But playing music can make a difference. I remember once I was touring throughout Texas, here I am in the middle of nowhere, Texas, playing my sitar… and I just thought, what an amazing opportunity, I get to travel and to introduce people to cultures that they don’t know, and see how you can mix things, and that can work.

So going to the UK, we’re very aware of what happened, but it’s inspiring for us that we get to go there and give something back. Broken Social Scene played Manchester the night after, and that’s an amazing thing. Some bands might have thought ‘we can’t do this, I’m not sure’ but they did it, Johnny Marr came on stage; music is supposed to unite.

I remember after the Bataclan tragedy, this sense that a safe space had been violated. Gigs always felt like an escape from your worries.
Growing up I used to go to shows all the time, at 14, 15: you could be the outsider at school but when you go to a show it’s a community. I was talking to the guys in the band: why are they targeting this? Because they want to terrorise, and destroy what we have.

It’s a beautiful thing that we have; not many countries have the opportunity to go to shows and experience music like this. And if you stop, because of fear, they’ve won.

It was great to see people saying ‘let’s get out to gigs tonight’ the day after.
Exactly – don’t be afraid. I’m not going to the UK being afraid, I’m going in there being excited, that we’re bringing something.

So how did the Elephant Stone idea come about originally?
I was in another band for about 10 years and I got disillusioned, being in a band, touring – I felt like we were giving nothing back, and I wanted to see if I had anything to give artistically.

I wanted to do a sitar project, and it just grew. It’s been a gradual thing, but we’ve been doing this for almost 10 years now. Time flies by.

Has the sound moved on a fair bit? On the new live EP you sound a lot deeper and heavier than when I first saw you, back in 2010.
This band’s evolved so much, we’ve put out four records, toured; I spent a year touring with the Black Angels, playing bass and sitar, and learned a lot there as well. Each album, it’s always us, but it’s always mutating. There’s a lot of freedom in the music we make.

When did you learn to play sitar?
I bought my first sitar in ‘97, and I met my guru in 2000 – I’ve been taking lessons from him for 17 years. He’s a phenomenal player, a German fellow who did his Masters in India for 10 years, then met a girl from Quebec and moved to Montreal – very multicultural.

It’s amazing how the sound from one instrument can immediately take you to a whole different place – spiritually, but also just geographically.
I mean, in all cultures, music becomes such a large identifiable part of who and what they are. It’s amazing the power of the sitar, it’s still just a regular stringed instrument but it has this emotional quality to it that translates through the noise.

Teenage Fanclub were a big early influence on you, and now you’re supporting them in Glasgow?
We’re playing Glasgow on Monday, then they announced their surprise show – I’m friends with Norman (Blake), he lives in Ontario now, so I just dropped them a line, and it worked out really well. When I was 13 years old and discovering ‘Bandwagonesque’, I never thought I’d be 39 and opening up for them, in Glasgow. I feel very fortunate.

And you’re playing your own headline gig the same night?
We’re playing the support gig then rushing over to play our show – so I may not catch their set. But I’ll see their soundcheck at least, maybe one or two songs. I’ve been talking to the promoter – ‘can I just see the Fanclub?’ but our curfew’s at 11pm, and they’re playing ‘til 11. It’s cool, we’re here to play music, that’s our job.

The European tour continues into June: what are you up to then?
We’re heading back to Canada, as I’m working on two new albums right now. We’re doing a normal Elephant Stone album, and the other is going to be an acid house album, with a sitar. I’m calling it acid house raga.

One final, random thing: I read that your track ‘Manipulator’ was used in Made in Chelsea?
Yeah, I only heard about it before or after. I don’t know the show?

It’s about awful, rich young idiots…
Ha! That’s funny, because that track is about the wealthy, and those in power trying to control others. Maybe it was a subversive message being sent through the episode.

– – –

– – –

The Live at the Verge’ EP is available HERE.

Words: Si Hawkins / @SiHawkins

Elephant Stone Tour Dates:

May
26 London Moth Club
27 Hastings The Printworks
28 Leeds Eiger Studios
29 Glasgow Mono
30 Sheffield Picture House Social
31 Brighton The Hope & Ruin

For tickets to the latest Elephant Stone shows click HERE.

Buy Clash Magazine

If just one North American band touches down for a UK tour this particular week, you’d want it to be Elephant Stone.

Named after a great Mancunian anthem, the Montreal-formed trio are a joyous clash of musical cultures, heavily inspired by British rock but with classical Indian influences due to their leader, the sitar-riffing Rishi Dhir.

That unique sound is captured splendidly on their new live EP, ‘Live at the Verge.’ Two of the band’s biggest influences are The Beatles, naturally, but also Teenage Fanclub, and they’ve just announced a bit of a dream gig for Dhir, on Monday: supporting the Fannies in Glasgow, before Elephant Stone rush elsewhere to play their own show. Quite an evening.

We caught up with Dhir in Belgium, the day after the first gig of their European tour in Holland, and just before they boarded the ferry to Britain.

– – –

– – –

It must be a pretty bewildering moment to be arriving in the UK… but I also think you’re the perfect band to go see this week.
Yeah, I heard the news on Monday. We were in Delph in the Netherlands, the morning after we arrived, and it was a shock.

But playing music can make a difference. I remember once I was touring throughout Texas, here I am in the middle of nowhere, Texas, playing my sitar… and I just thought, what an amazing opportunity, I get to travel and to introduce people to cultures that they don’t know, and see how you can mix things, and that can work.

So going to the UK, we’re very aware of what happened, but it’s inspiring for us that we get to go there and give something back. Broken Social Scene played Manchester the night after, and that’s an amazing thing. Some bands might have thought ‘we can’t do this, I’m not sure’ but they did it, Johnny Marr came on stage; music is supposed to unite.

I remember after the Bataclan tragedy, this sense that a safe space had been violated. Gigs always felt like an escape from your worries.
Growing up I used to go to shows all the time, at 14, 15: you could be the outsider at school but when you go to a show it’s a community. I was talking to the guys in the band: why are they targeting this? Because they want to terrorise, and destroy what we have.

It’s a beautiful thing that we have; not many countries have the opportunity to go to shows and experience music like this. And if you stop, because of fear, they’ve won.

It was great to see people saying ‘let’s get out to gigs tonight’ the day after.
Exactly – don’t be afraid. I’m not going to the UK being afraid, I’m going in there being excited, that we’re bringing something.

So how did the Elephant Stone idea come about originally?
I was in another band for about 10 years and I got disillusioned, being in a band, touring – I felt like we were giving nothing back, and I wanted to see if I had anything to give artistically.

I wanted to do a sitar project, and it just grew. It’s been a gradual thing, but we’ve been doing this for almost 10 years now. Time flies by.

Has the sound moved on a fair bit? On the new live EP you sound a lot deeper and heavier than when I first saw you, back in 2010.
This band’s evolved so much, we’ve put out four records, toured; I spent a year touring with the Black Angels, playing bass and sitar, and learned a lot there as well. Each album, it’s always us, but it’s always mutating. There’s a lot of freedom in the music we make.

When did you learn to play sitar?
I bought my first sitar in ‘97, and I met my guru in 2000 – I’ve been taking lessons from him for 17 years. He’s a phenomenal player, a German fellow who did his Masters in India for 10 years, then met a girl from Quebec and moved to Montreal – very multicultural.

It’s amazing how the sound from one instrument can immediately take you to a whole different place – spiritually, but also just geographically.
I mean, in all cultures, music becomes such a large identifiable part of who and what they are. It’s amazing the power of the sitar, it’s still just a regular stringed instrument but it has this emotional quality to it that translates through the noise.

Teenage Fanclub were a big early influence on you, and now you’re supporting them in Glasgow?
We’re playing Glasgow on Monday, then they announced their surprise show – I’m friends with Norman (Blake), he lives in Ontario now, so I just dropped them a line, and it worked out really well. When I was 13 years old and discovering ‘Bandwagonesque’, I never thought I’d be 39 and opening up for them, in Glasgow. I feel very fortunate.

And you’re playing your own headline gig the same night?
We’re playing the support gig then rushing over to play our show – so I may not catch their set. But I’ll see their soundcheck at least, maybe one or two songs. I’ve been talking to the promoter – ‘can I just see the Fanclub?’ but our curfew’s at 11pm, and they’re playing ‘til 11. It’s cool, we’re here to play music, that’s our job.

The European tour continues into June: what are you up to then?
We’re heading back to Canada, as I’m working on two new albums right now. We’re doing a normal Elephant Stone album, and the other is going to be an acid house album, with a sitar. I’m calling it acid house raga.

One final, random thing: I read that your track ‘Manipulator’ was used in Made in Chelsea?
Yeah, I only heard about it before or after. I don’t know the show?

It’s about awful, rich young idiots…
Ha! That’s funny, because that track is about the wealthy, and those in power trying to control others. Maybe it was a subversive message being sent through the episode.

– – –

– – –

The Live at the Verge’ EP is available HERE.

Words: Si Hawkins / @SiHawkins

Elephant Stone Tour Dates:

May
26 London Moth Club
27 Hastings The Printworks
28 Leeds Eiger Studios
29 Glasgow Mono
30 Sheffield Picture House Social
31 Brighton The Hope & Ruin

For tickets to the latest Elephant Stone shows click HERE.

Buy Clash Magazine

Source: Clash Music