Albert Castiglia Up All Night Review

Music is subjective, and what can be great for one listener can sound dry to another. Albert Castiglia’s Up All Night is a perfect example of an album that can be fantastic or disappointing, depending on taste. Up All Night features Albert Castiglia (guitar and vocals), Brian Menendez (drums), and James Pritchard (bass).

The entirety of Up All Night has a dated feel. Stylistically, Castiglia opts for a tried-and-true sound, most often in a 12-bar blues progression. This is effective for some songs, such as “Hoodoo on Me,” “I Been Up All Night,” and “Woman Don’t Lie.” However, this can start to drag on when applying this writing style to an album-length project. The arrangement of Up All Night lacks a clear structure, leading to times where the pacing can lose momentum. Much of this is forgivable, given you enjoy classic blues and 1950s-early 60s-style rock and roll. However, the album suffers from a few noticeable issues in production. For example, at the end of “Delilah,” the volume fades away with the song. Then, “Chase Her Around The House” begins with loud and hectic guitar chords, creating a jarring experience when listening at higher volumes.

Castiglia carries much of the album with his guitar playing, on which much of the music rests. And when Castiglia’s guitar is good, it is great. Songs like “Quit Your Bitching” and “I Been Up All Night” carry a soulful gravitas while delivering the energy that serves the song. There are enough strong guitar moments to make the album worth a listen.

With all my criticism, Up All Night rarely sounds bad. However, it often sounds safe in that it chooses a comfortable old sound. If you are looking for something new or risky, look elsewhere, but Up All Night delivers a nostalgic trip back in time for those interested.

The Review: 6.5/10

Can’t Miss Tracks

– Hoodoo On Me
– I Been Up All Night
– Quit Your Bitching
– Woman Don’t Lie

The Big Hit

– I Been Up All Night

Review by Mark Hunstein

Buy the album: Amazon | Amazon UK

Source: Blues Rock Review